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Our Christmas Pit Stop brought the festivities to Morgan Works London

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Spread over three days, the Classic Driver team curated a diverse and stylish array of items available from the CD Shop to make for the perfect Christmas pop-up store. Read on to find out more.
Tucked away in one of Kensington’s idyllic Mews streets sits one of Morgan Motor Company’s home-from-homes, a beautifully restored experience centre filled to the brim with models from their rich past and ever-exciting future. Alongside the main showroom sits a small storage garage, which made for the perfect space for our Christmas Pit Stop.

On display around the pop-up shop were some of our favourite pieces, as well as some ideal gifts for petrol-headed loved ones. Visitors were able to skim through the latest book releases from Coolnvintage, Porsche Unseen, and Curves Magazine all carefully curated alongside related models from the Amalgam Collection.

Being a typically wintery few days in the capital, the temperature ensured both staff and visitors got to try on a variety of clothing from iconic British outfitters Connolly, as well as some Teddy Jackets from Motoluxe, and other winter apparel from Malle London, Easy on the Extras, Recaro and Private White VC. These winter warmers certainly helped ease the chill, as did the constant supply of delicious coffee kindly shipped over from the USA by Drive Coffee.

Perhaps the star of the show is awarded to the four-wheeled machine parked outside the pop-up, a 60% scaled version of 007’s Aston Martin DB5 from The Little Car Company. Loaded with working gadgets straight from Q’s arsenal, this fully electric Aston brought a steady crowd of onlookers, all itching to see the smoke screen and changeable number plates in action. Even more four-wheeled fun came from Banzai skateboards and their incredible array of hand-crafted metal boards, fresh from Santa Monica.

There’s nothing we like more than a good accessory, and our Pit Stop ensured even the smallest of items got the spotlight they deserve. Some of our highlights include Bennett Winch luggage, the finest leather goods from Café Leather, Unimatic Watches, Connolly’s pre-war style race goggles and some great looking shades from Ed Scarlett when the sun finally made an appearance. Each considered item was displayed to flow effortlessly as visitors made their way around the shop, in which the walls featured a smattering of drama and vibrancy from Automobilist prints, as well as some stunning pieces from visual artist Alan Thornton. As for the drivers and riders who visited us, their eyes were often locked onto Hedon Helmet’s latest creations, inspired by space-age pop culture and 1970s colour palettes to create a modern-day helmet with the coolest of retro flair. Another big talking point came from Baltic Watches, and their latest offerings inspired by Paul Newman’s iconic Daytona. 

Of course, the rose-gold, three-wheeled machine in the middle of the room came courtesy of Morgan themselves, showcasing the all-new Super 3 complete with a host of optional extras that encourage adventure. The striking new design and durable interior was a real talking point amongst our visitors, with many itching to take one for a spin – us included!

From everyone at Classic Driver, we’d like to thank the ever-friendly team at Morgan, the dozens of brands who kindly allowed us to display their items, and the huge number of visitors who took the time to check out our Pit Stop. We are certain it won’t be the last!

Photos by Elliot Newton
 If you missed out on visiting our Christmas Pit Stop, items from the curation collection are still available to order from the Classic Driver Shop!
 
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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

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The dwindling case for living in London

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The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

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London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

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By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

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Gentrification is not a sin

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Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

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