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Brilliant Things to do in Tooting — London x London

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Love This? Save and Share!It’s not just a neighbourhood with a funny name. There are so many brilliant things to do in Tooting. Find out some hidden London secrets with our handy guide.  Tooting often goes under the radar of people looking to soak up the best of what London has to offer. That might be for the best as it means more of this neighbourhood’s hidden delights for us. From a lesser-known food market that could rival Brixton Village for hipness, to the largest lido in the UK, and a bunch of eateries that will make you rethink how far you’re willing to travel for a good meal, there’s plenty of reasons to come exploring this part of the city. But don’t just fumble around in the dark like a muppet, read our guide for everything you need to know about Tooting. Things to do in TootingHave a Night Out at Tooting Tram & SocialTooting Tram and Social is Tooting’s hub of all things nightlife. If you’re looking to let your hair down in the neighbourhood, chances are you’ll find all the right ingredients for a good night here. They do open mic nights of live music, stand-up comedy evenings, and nights of genre music like their Latin evening (third Friday of every month). But their regular set up is a bar and DJ sets to take you into the early hours. More info here.Eat Your Way Round Tooting Market’s Indie Eateries Tooting Market is a bit of a hidden food heaven. While everyone else is queuing up for hours in Borough Market or fighting over the last bits of street food at Maltby Street, you can be sampling some of London’s best bites right here in Tooting.There’s cuisines from Greece to Guyana, and everything from drinks to desserts. Our favourite? Unwined. A wine bar that buzzes with activity come nightfall, serving up well-sourced vinos by glass and bottle. They put on regular wine tasting events and have a delightful rotating menu of charcuterie boards that deserve as much attention as any other dish in the market. Hang out on Tooting BecTooting Bec has a history that dates back to Norman Britain. It’s recorded in the Doomsday Book as having 5 hides. It had 5½ ploughs (we feel bad for that sixth farmer), 13 acres and  rendered £7 in what we assume is taxes. Nowadays this area has a bit more going for it – there’s plenty of things to do in Tooting Bec. The bustling intersection boasts a spread of shops and great local restaurants, and ends with the sizable Tooting Common – a beautiful green space (read park) that’s pretty sizable as London goes. Take a Dip in the LidoIn the summer months a hot London day demands a dip in a Lido, and Tooting Bec Lido has plenty of reasons to be your top pick. Not only is it one of the oldest open-air pools in the UK but it’s also the largest, and has a bit of movie history tied into it as well. It appears in a scene in Snatch when Brad Pitt is filmed swimming underwater – though you can’t see too much of the scenery. Play Bingo at the Most Lavishly Decorated Cinema in the UKLooking for fun things to do in Tooting? Check out this old gem. The Granada in Tooting started life as a cinema, and a pretty grand one at that. Our title’s term of the “Most Lavishly Decorated Cinema in the UK” isn’t just our opinion, it’s shared by most people with an eye on the art deco community.Today it doesn’t function as a cinema anymore, but if you really want to see it you can go and play a game of bingo there. Buzz Bingo runs the operation and has plenty of playtimes so you shouldn’t have any trouble booking a slot. Things to do in Tooting: Eating & DrinkingGraveney Gin Graveney Gin is the child of Victoria Christie, a self-professed gin lover who was knocking back G&Ts before they became cool and brewed up her first batch moonshine-style in the kitchen sink. Since then the gins have become more refined and the company has blown up. They now have their own bar and bottleshop right in the bustling heart of Tooting Market where you can sample a bit of their magic. Want to learn more about the spirit? They also do gin tasting masterclasses every Thursday evening. For more information and to book a seat on the masterclass, check their website here.Vijayakrishna Every neighbourhood needs a good Indian and in Tooting that comes in the form of Vijayakrishna. This golden oldie has been serving the locals for yonks, and is an ever-lasting fav. They do authentic food from the Southern-Indian region of Kerala. It’s made with care and devotion to the true flavours of the subcontinent in a way that makes a meal here a bit of a journey in itself.Oh, and the price is more than reasonable. Juliet’s Quality FoodsWe like a restaurant that’s straightforward with what it does, and that’s what first drew our eye to Juliet’s Quality Foods. What we found was a sweet little cafe serving up some indulgent breakfast hits. Bacon and egg baps, posh fry ups, waffles with generous scoops of ice cream, the works. You’ll probably have a hard time deciding what you want to eat. You could try it all. Just make sure you save room for some of Juliet’s cake.The Selkirk SW17Sunday swings around and you’ll be wondering about a roast. We suggest you look no further than the Selkirk. This Gastropub has some of the best grub in the area and the roasts are worth schlepping it across London for. Everything they cook has a fresh, seasonal focus that champions produce from the British Isles. All of the above should be enjoyed in their leafy pub garden if the weather permits. What to do in Tooting: Practical Tips Tooting sprawls. You’ve got multiple stops you can get off at depending on where you want to go in the neighbourhood. Consult your route-planner before setting off to save your legs a little.  Tooting has a bunch of great off-the-beaten-track Indian restaurants. If you’re feeling adventurous, dip into any one that takes your fancy. It’s likely to be a cracking meal. Things to do in Tooting: Map 

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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

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The dwindling case for living in London

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The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

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London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

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By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

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Gentrification is not a sin

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Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

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