Connect with us

Uncategorized

Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland Returns to London — London x London

Published

on



Love This? Save and Share!Hyde Park’s Winter Wonderland – AKA the festive event of the season – returns. Here’s everything you need to know. We might be biased, but we think London at Christmas is absolutely unbeatable. The Christmas lights go up. The big shopping spaces begin competing to see who can erect the biggest tree. And Hyde Park opens its Winter Wonderland. It’s basically an all-singing, all-dancing festive festival, with fairground rides, an ice rink, plenty of food and winter warming drinks. This year it is open from the 18th November 2022 – 2nd January 2023. Read on to find out exactly what’s going down. What Can You Expect Where to begin? Expect Hyde Park to be completely pimped up in festive decorations. We actually went up Battersea Power Station’s new Lift 109 viewing station the other evening, and we could see the Winter Wonderland from all the way south of the river. Which has gotten us super excited, if you couldn’t tell.Food and DrinkMaybe the coolest (see what we did there) place to grab a drink at the event is the Ice Bar, This insta-perfect spot is built out of giant cubes of ice, and rocks an 80’s Après-ski theme. There’s a carousel bar too. That one gently spins you around while you sip on winter-warmers. But, we’ll be honest: Christmas at Winter Wonderland is a street food affair, with whole tents given over to pop-up food stalls and much-loved London names like Doughnut Time and Edgy Veggie making appearances. And, of course, bratwurst for days. Fairground RidesThere’ll be the usual spread of fairground rides, including more than their fair share of roller coasters, one of which – Munich Looping –  has been shipped in from Oktoberfest. The giant ferris wheel makes a return. That’s a bit of a WW institution – the party wouldn’t be quite right without it. From its pinnacle, 70m up, you’ll have views of London and the ant-like Wonderlanders way down below you. If heights like that are your thing, you’ll wanna get yourself on the Hangover. That’s one of those vertical drop rides that hangs you at 85m up, lets you enjoy the sights for a few seconds, and then plunges you stomach-turningly fast towards the ground. This year sees the introduction of a bonkers-looking ride called Discovery that rotates 360 degrees on a twin axis while flipping through the air. What exactly you discover on that ride is beyond us, but we imagine it might have something to do with the contents of your stomach. Other Bits of FunWe’re really excited for the Christmas Circus. Zippos is a returning feature from previous Winter Wonderlands, bringing a Christmas/winter-themed show with actual world class performers and crazy giant dancing polar bears. Need we say more?No festive period would be complete without some embarrassing slip-and-slide moments on an ice rink. Winter Wonderland knows that full well, and has one of its own that’s also a bit of a London institution. For the Christmas shoppers among you, there’s a Christmas market selling all sorts of trinkets and hand-crafted goodies that would make excellent stocking fillers for the big day. Know that the above are just highlights, and that Winter Wonderland has too much to do than we could reproduce here. Besides, you should probably have a little of the excitement of the unexpected when you go.All in all, if you want the full-magical Christmas package. Winter Wonderland is the place to get it. Winter Wonderland 2022: Practical InformationWhen?Winter Wonderland is open from 10am – 10pm from the 18th November 2022 – 2nd January 2023.Where?Winter Wonderland is held in Hyde Park – the nearest tube stations are Hyde Park Corner and Marble Arch.Tickets?The tickets work on a staggered price depending on when you want to visit. Off peak slots are free, standard tickets are £5, and peak tickets are £7.50. You’ll need to book ahead before you go – you can do that here – and when you do you’ll see the slots and pricing available. It’s pretty straightforward. Of course, once you’re in, you’ll have to fork out a bit more to get on the rides, eat, and see the attractions. Winter Wonderland 2022: MapWinter Wonderland: Read Next

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

E-posta hesabınız yayımlanmayacak. Gerekli alanlar * ile işaretlenmişlerdir

Uncategorized

Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

Published

on

By



Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

The dwindling case for living in London

Published

on

By


The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

Most popular

Steerpike

Is Prince Harry holding Meghan back?

London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

January sale: save over 60%

Get a whole year’s worth of The Spectator from just £49

CLAIM

By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Gentrification is not a sin

Published

on

By


Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

Continue Reading

Trending

101thingsbeforeyoudie All Rights Reserved. - © 2022