Connect with us

Uncategorized

London’s Mayor Celebrates Notorious Islamist Group :: Middle East Forum

Published

on


Mayor of London Sadiq Khan addresses the Muslim Council of Britain’s 25th anniversary dinner.

Leading British politicians have lionized an Islamist group blacklisted by the government because of its officials’ support for terror and anti-Semitism.
On November 25, the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, addressed the 25th anniversary dinner of the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB), one of Britain’s leading Islamist organizations.
Speaking to a crowd of current and former MCB officials and the group’s supporters, Mayor Khan declared: “Since its founding, the MCB has realized its vision of helping to shape a more just and fairer society. I want to pay tribute to all the Secretary Generals this evening, to all the elders who recognised the importance of establishing the MCB.”
The MCB’s “elders,” however, are prominent Islamists with a long history of spouting and encouraging extremism. Most were part of an Islamist network known as Jamaat-e-Islami.

The MCB’s “elders,” however, are prominent Islamists with a long history of spouting and encouraging extremism.

Writing in the Guardian in 2005, journalist Martin Bright warned that the leaders of MCB and many of its affiliate organizations were inspired by Maulana Mawdudi, an Islamist ideologue from South Asia whose writings “call for a global Islamic revival” and influenced Sayyid Qutb, “usually credited as the founding father of modern Islamic radicalism and one of the inspirations for al-Qaeda.”
Indeed, a report published by the British Government’s Department for Communities and Local Government explicitly noted the MCB’s “linkages to Islamist movements like the Muslim Brotherhood and the Jama’at-i Islami.”
Founded in 1997, the MCB has kept true to its extremist roots. Over the past decades, it has organized boycotts of Holocaust Memorial Day, its officials have openly expressed support for the Hamas terrorist group, and the organization has even successfully used its influence over government to exclude moderate Muslims from government programs and events.
Even today, the organization’s loyalty to its radical founders is clear. Founders and MCB luminaries at this year’s anniversary dinner included Sir Iqbal Sacranie, a key organizer of the protests and threats against novelist Salman Rushdie, who once said: “‘Death, perhaps, is a bit too easy for him … his mind must be tormented for the rest of his life unless he asks for forgiveness to Almighty Allah.”

The IFE has told its members that through Islamic law and “jihad,” it aims to build an “Islamic social and political order,” free from music, television, and “free mixing with women.”

Sacranie was joined by former MCB secretary-general Muhammed Abdul Bari, once chair of Jamaat-e-Islami’s European arm, the Islamic Forum of Europe (IFE). According to documents uncovered by the Telegraph¸ the IFE has told its members that through Islamic law and “jihad,” the IFE aims to build an “Islamic social and political order,” free from music, television and “free mixing with women.”
These organizations are closely interconnected. The IFE is based at the East London Mosque, which is a close partner of the MCB and sponsored the anniversary dinner at which Mayor Khan spoke.
It is noteworthy that Khan, a leading official of Britain’s Labour Party, agreed to speak, given that, in 2009, it was a Labour government that finally severed relations with the MCB, after journalists uncovered that MCB officials and affiliates were among signatories to the Istanbul Declaration, a document that advocated attacks on British soldiers and Jewish communities.
Now under Conservative rule, the government’s blacklisting still remains in force, with Downing Street recently stating: “The UK government has a long-standing policy of not engaging with the MCB and that has not changed.”
Despite this position, Mayor Khan was joined at the 25th anniversary dinner by Ed Davey, leader of Britain’s Liberal Democrat Party, and Assistant Commissioner the Metropolitan Police, Louisa Rolfe.

From left to right: Mayor of London Sadiq Khan, Assistant Commissioner the Metropolitan Police Louisa Rolfe, Secretary General of the MCB Zara Mohammed, and Liberal Democrats Leader Ed Davey.

Other senior politicians were also seemingly present, including Anas Sarwar, leader of the Scottish Labour Party, Afzal Khan, a Labour MP (and an Islamist), and another Labour MP, Naz Shah.
The senior policewoman thanked the MCB (which she referred to as the “Muslim community”) for its “wise counsel” and told the crowd “We must do better to reflect the communities we serve.”
Indeed, Rolfe, and the leading British politicians present, would have been wise to choose a Muslim organization partner that reflects British Muslim communities at all. A 2016 report by the think tank Policy Exchange revealed that “Groups like the Muslim Council of Britain enjoy the support” of just “2 to 4% of Britain’s Muslims.”
Will Western politicians ever learn to reject Islamists and work with ordinary Muslims instead?
Sam Westrop is the director of Islamist Watch, a project of the Middle East Forum.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

E-posta hesabınız yayımlanmayacak. Gerekli alanlar * ile işaretlenmişlerdir

Uncategorized

ICE London 2023 to feature exhibitors from record 68 nations – IAG

Published

on

By



Industry trade show ICE London will feature exhibitors from a record 68 nations, topping the previous best of 65 set three years ago, according to organizer Clarion Gaming.
ICE London returns as a full-sized show for the first time since 2020 from 7 to 9 February, with the total 623 exhibitors representing everything from Argentina to Australia and Macau to Mexico.
“No other exhibition in the gaming space can come anywhere near the internationalism of ICE,” said Clarion Gaming Managing Director, Stuart Hunter.
“To have 68 nations represented by our community of exhibitors means that visitors are immediately part of what is a global experience with unique access to the smartest gaming innovators drawn from every corner of the world. There are very few exhibitions of scale in any industry sector which are able to compare with such international representation and legitimately lay claim to being a ‘global’ or a ‘world’ event.
“Once an event is recognized as being genuinely international, stakeholder groups including brands, regulators, trade associations, media groups and strategic industry-wide bodies focus their activities accordingly.
“Research that we’ve undertaken has shown that for many people ICE and iGB Affiliate London actually start on the Sunday preceding and finish on the following Saturday. In that week we estimate that over 100 gambling industry events will take place outside of the show hours providing a new and compelling perspective on why ICE and iGB Affiliate London are so influential and important to the world industry.”
IAG will have a team of four at ICE London next week. Visit us at Stand ND7-C.

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

David Ford and Annie Dressner Live in London

Published

on

By


There’s something special about London on a Saturday night – there’s a certain buzz in the air as you head into the Capital city. For me that buzz was extra special, as I was going to see David Ford and Annie Dressner at The Lexington in Islington. I literally listened to their ’10 Days (Live)’ album for the first time a week ago, but since then it’s been on repeat and heading in I knew that the night was going to be special.
The Lexington is a great place for music, with a bar on the ground floor before heading up the winding stairs to the spacious venue itself. And as the crowd started coming in, the atmosphere in the room was growing by the minute.
Opening the night was Scottish singer songwriter Gary Stewart. He set the night off really well, with an engaging set that got the crowd onside from the start. He opened with his 2021 single ‘Hot To Trot‘ and you already knew the set was going to be a good one – a rousing folk song with great lyrical dexterity. The highlight of the set was ‘Frontlines’, a simply gorgeous song (check out a YouTube video of the song here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDCLwYwsesk). Gary ended with a fine cover of Paul Simon’s ‘Song for the Asking’.
It was time for a quick visit to the bar before settling down for the main event. 
The duo appeared on the stage to great applause, David in an orange shirt and Annie in a sparkling black dress. They opened with ‘Easy Falling’, the first song that I’ve ever heard of theirs, and a song that convinced me I needed to listen to the rest of the album. This slow and moving number is a touching love song and shows off the brilliant harmonies of David and Annie – there’s something special about the English (David) and US accents (Annie) mingling in the way that they do. 
Throughout the set, there were so many highlights. ‘Something I’ll Have to Learn‘ is a song with an almost timeless feel that feels like a conversation in song, Annie’s original ‘Strangers Who Knew Each Other’s Names‘ was simply brilliant and ‘Some Folks Are Lucky I Guess‘ is a song with a great sentiment. ‘Can’t Help What I Want‘ (below) is a great example of those brilliant harmonies that the two share.

‘Trash‘, a cover of the Suede hit, was a particular highlight – a song that was a nice surprise on the live album. As they break into ‘Oh maybe, maybe it’s the clothes you wear‘ it almost feels like this was a song that Suede wrote for David and Annie, their version is that good. Outstanding.
The set had a second cover, a song that Annie introduced as ‘an American classic‘. This classic was ‘Ain’t No Pleasing You‘ from Chas and Dave, a song that typified the cockney sound of London back in the 1980’s. I love the way they re-worked it and there was something special about the way Annie sings the word ‘Darling’ in her US twang that just resonated and put a smile on my face.
There were great moments of humour throughout the night, the chat between the two great. At one point mid-song, Annie passed her guitar to David, exclaiming ‘I knew there were chords in this song, I just didn’t know which ones‘ which had the crowd laughing.
The best of the night was saved till last. ‘Warning Sign’ had quickly become my favourite song from the pair and hearing it live in person lived up to all expectations. There’s such a beauty in live music, and hearing songs like this with other people in a venue can really bring a song home – and almost even change your own personal relationship with a song.
The final song of the night (there was no encore as David explained that they literally had no more songs!) was ‘Put Me In A Corner’. Annie’s vocals take the lead in this track and it was just magical, the emotion of the song emanating from the stage and filling the room. You can listen and see for yourself below.

You never know what to expect when you see an artist or artists perform for the first time. Some exceed expectations and some just don’t hit the heights you expect. In David Ford and Annie Dressner, it was definitely the former. The gig was stripped back – just two people on a stage creating a moment. And what a moment it was.
Annie and David and reviewer Nick Cantwell
Check out their websites and hit and follow the social links!
http://www.dressnerford.com/

Home


http://anniedressner.com/
***Note – I need to say a word about the audience for the gig. The audience was impeccable, with barely any talking at all at any point (apart from whispered orders at the bar). Credit goes to Gary, Annie and David, who managed to grab the audience from the start, but also to everyone there. If you were there yourself, give yourself a high five!***
Review written by Nick Cantwell (instagram.com/nickcantwellmanagement)
 
 
 


Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

Published

on

By



Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

Continue Reading

Trending

101thingsbeforeyoudie All Rights Reserved. - © 2022