Connect with us

Uncategorized

Making London’s communities safer through public health

Published

on



Public health consultant, Farrah Hart, discusses how a public health approach can help address community safety in London
A public health approach acknowledges that your life circumstances – including traumatic experiences in childhood, deprivation, racism and discrimination – mean that some people and communities are more likely to be affected by crime and violence. Crime and violence are not considered in isolation, but rather as a symptom of the environment and influences that impact on individuals throughout their lives. This is certainly the case for violence impacting young people, where a disproportionate number of young Black Londoners are represented as both victims and perpetrators. Young Londoners living in poverty are also more likely to be affected, and those at risk of violence are more likely to suffer from multiple and complex health issues, including mental and physical health problems, learning difficulties, and substance misuse.
A public health approach recognises that crime and violence are not inevitable and can be prevented, and that’s one of the reasons why the Mayor set up London’s Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) in 2019.
The VRU is a team of specialists who bring people together across London to better understand why violence happens and how to prevent it. They work to reduce harm and exploitation of children and young people, whilst increasing their opportunities, engagement and influence. Other targets include increasing wellbeing and achievement in education, which are dramatically improved through attendance; as well as working with communities impacted by violence. The VRU forges partnerships across London to help bring about change, whilst also conducting research and generating evidence about what works to reduce violence. To date, the Mayor has invested £35.4 million in the VRU, alongside funding from the Home Office. As a Public Health Consultant in the newly established GLA Group Public Health Unit, I work to support London’s Violence Reduction Unit as it leads the public health approach to reducing violence, from City Hall.
This work has far-reaching consequences for communities, and those who might otherwise be tragically lost to violence. The pandemic saw a worrying rise in the number of serious incidents relating to child deaths, and around 1/3 of children and young people’s deaths (aged 0-19) in the UK are preventable. I am working with partners, including OHID, NHS England (London Region), and London Directors of Public Health to develop a new strategy to tackle child mortality, including older children’s deaths from violence. Included within this will be the great work that the VRU does to save young Londoners’ lives, demonstrating that we as a City are serious about tackling child mortality across the life course in London, going beyond health and social care and really linking up partners across the system.
Alongside my work with the VRU, I support the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) to help feed public health considerations and advice into decisions made on policing and crime. The establishment of the GLA Group Public Health Unit as a shared service for MOPAC and the VRU builds on a solid foundation of joint working.
Earlier this year the Mayor published his Violence Against Women and Girls Strategy, which takes a public health approach to protect women’s right to safety, focusing on preventing violence against women and girls from happening in the first place. While MOPAC leads on delivering the strategy and the VRU leads on the prevention side of VAWG, tackling Violence Against Women and Girls is very much a combined City Hall initiative.
MOPAC works to ensure victims receive better engagement with and outcomes from the criminal justice system, and addresses the behaviour of the perpetrators of abuse. In my role, I support MOPAC to better engage with partners from the health sector, who are an essential part of the wider system to tackle violence against women and girls. As well as bringing local authority public health and NHS input to the strategy, I worked closely with MOPAC and the VRU to convene a roundtable between health and policing partners, where key discussions could take place around the NHS’s role in preventing and tackling violence against women and girls.
Our Unit is working with MOPAC on the London Drugs Forum, which brings together regional leaders to take a whole-London approach to drug enforcement and treatment, building partnerships between criminal justice and health authorities at strategic and local level. The Government’s drug strategy requires local authorities to set up their own local partnerships and plans to tackle drugs and drug harms. But with 33 local authorities across London, and with drug issues crossing boundaries, the London Drugs Forum recognises that there are some issues that would benefit from London-wide harmonisation or a single London-wide approach.
The GLA Group Public Health Unit has been working with MOPAC and the VRU to identify priority areas where we can work together to make the biggest improvements for Londoners through public health, including safeguarding the mental health of victims of crime and increasing trust and confidence in the police. 
Our work together is driven by the huge opportunity that public health has to reduce violence and make our city safer. Although the system is complex, the issue is politically charged at a national level and there is at times a conflict between the punitive and public health approach. We need to draw upon the evidence of what works by taking an approach that is underpinned by data and intelligence, seeks evidence of effectiveness to tackle the problem, and look for system-level solutions. Our ultimate goal is having a better, healthier, and safer environment for Londoners.
Farrah Hart, Public health consultant

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

E-posta hesabınız yayımlanmayacak. Gerekli alanlar * ile işaretlenmişlerdir

Uncategorized

Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

Published

on

By



Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

The dwindling case for living in London

Published

on

By


The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

Most popular

Steerpike

Is Prince Harry holding Meghan back?

London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

January sale: save over 60%

Get a whole year’s worth of The Spectator from just £49

CLAIM

By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Gentrification is not a sin

Published

on

By


Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

Continue Reading

Trending

101thingsbeforeyoudie All Rights Reserved. - © 2022