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Sweaty Betty Opens Its Debut Concept Store Within A London Landmark

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The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Designed by women, for women, meet Sweaty Betty’s latest store, ‘The PowerHouse,’ in the recently developed Battersea Power Station. Situated within the London landmark, this is the debut concept store from activewear label Sweaty Betty, and at 2,400 sqft, it’s the largest of its stores worldwide. Jessica Wells, Vice President, Creative at Sweaty Betty, tells us about its new slick home, from its name to the oversized sound system.

The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
‘The PowerHouse’ name – inspired by BPS
It was a no-brainer to call this space The PowerHouse. It captures an immediate visceral feeling of strength and energy. An undeniable force. It’s a literal and direct connection of the product to a place full of emotion merged into one impactful name. Iconic and memorable. This store only scratches the surface of where we want to go – we want to take our customers beyond to a place no other activewear brand is going.

The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
FIREBIRD – SB’s new primary color in collaboration with Pantone
We are in love with our new brand color, ‘firebird,’ which we developed with Pantone. We wanted it to be the most vibrant version of orange, fusing the vibrant high energy of red and the positivity of yellow. It’s all about a feeling and creates immediate visual imagery in mind, that I can’t wait to build on creatively. It increases oxygen to the brain! I also love that it demands attention. There’s a bit of firebird in everyone! We want people to feel that confidence within.

The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith

3D speaker installation – sneak peek into SB’s future work with emerging women’s talent
Music is so powerful; it can take any mind and body to another place and, of course, works hand in hand with being active. I wanted the store to have a sensory connection; we worked on a bespoke playlist for The PowerHouse full of empowering, talented female artists.

Designed using our logo, the oversized speaker installation in the window of The PowerHouse store represents a living sculpture evolving through sound. I’d love to push this concept further through human interaction and see what experience that could create… An unexpected sculpture of discovery and meaning.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Power Pods – twice the size of standard fitting rooms
Nobody loves a changing room, so it was super important for us to create an environment of comfort, a safe space where squeezing into a tight pair of leggings wasn’t so daunting. The Power Pods have been designed specifically to feel more luxe and tactile with flattering dimmable light. I wanted to create a place you can hang out with friends and empower one another.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Minimalism – Premium design concept and layout
I wanted this space to feel more premium and elevated. It’s a step in the right direction in line with the new brand positioning. A teaser of what’s to come. The store design is inspired by the circle and the cylinder, representing the Sweaty Betty symbol and the iconic BPS chimneys. We used this as a design theme throughout the space, reinforcing connection and meaning.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Stylist Hub – mobile check-out system
The mobile check-out system allows customers to pay for their items at any location in the store; this creates a more comfortable check-out experience and will enable them to avoid long queues, which can only be a good thing! The mobile checkout system helps to create a seamless shopping experience from start to finish.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Signature recycling program – bring in your pre-loved activewear
Sweaty Betty’s recycling program allows customers to bring their old leggings to the store and drop them off; we either re-home them or recycle them with SOEX. As a thank you, customers receive a £10 voucher off their next £50 spend. Of course, this program also exists within The PowerHouse, and we encourage customers to get involved!The PowerHousePetros instagram.com/petrosstudio
Exclusive product – limited edition FIREBIRD hoodies and totes
We worked hard with Pantone to create our new colorway, ‘Firebird’ and wanted to utilize it in a way that consumers could also engage with. In celebration of this new chapter of Sweaty Betty and the introduction of Firebird, we designed limited-edition hoodies and totes available at The PowerHouse.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Immersion – floor-to-ceiling LED screens and high gloss fiber mannequins
I wanted a strong sense of scale, tactility and impact to come through, but with balance. Not to overpower but to uplift and energize. We maxed out our power usage through the floor-to-ceiling screens, which excite the eye from outside the store. Creating a sense of energy and excitement and acts as a tool for discovery.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Community – a space for connection and a sense of community
Our main objective when developing The Powerhouse store was to create a space for connection and a sense of community that makes our customers feel empowered and strong. We want the area to be more than a store but a comfortable, fun, exciting environment where people come together and leave feeling uplifted.The PowerHouseAndrew Meredith
Address: Battersea Power Station, 244 The Power Station Circus Road South, London, SW11 8BZ


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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

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The dwindling case for living in London

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The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

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London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

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By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

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Gentrification is not a sin

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Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

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