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2022 Review: Culture Team | London City Hall

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The year in review – highlights of 2022!
Despite many challenges for our sector and London as a whole, 2022 has been a year where the Culture and Creative Industries and 24 Hour London teams have done so much to help London get back on its feet.

We are helping venues across London to become more accessible to people with dementia with our Dementia Friendly Venues Charter, now with 129 organisations pledging to make changes.
From January, London Borough of Culture launched in Lewisham. Highlighting the Climate Emergency, Lewisham’s musical history and status as a borough of Sanctuary. Lewisham’s year as London Borough of Culture has been a huge success with more than 300 events and 162,000 people taking part. Their outstanding programme of events has showcased the borough’s grassroots creativity, musical heritage and diverse communities. It was created with 200 partner organisations, 710 volunteers and supported 1,800 young people to help enter the creative industries. It has truly shown the power of the arts to inspire all ages and has been a fantastic spotlight on the innovation and artistry that can be found across our capital.
In March we wrapped up a 10 month long events programme as part of the Mayor’s ‘Let’s Do London’ tourism campaign. Working with over 730 partners across London’s culture, hospitality and retail sectors to deliver over 500 events – including free film screenings on Trafalgar Square, light spectaculars in the City of London and pop up performances across central London – delivering over £80 million to London’s economy and attracting over 300,000 visitors. 
‘We Design for the Community’ was a pilot scheme we launched in April, pairing students with cultural and creative organisations to provide marketing resource and allow students to work on a design brief and earn London Living Wage. It provided real-life experience for the students, improving their skills and affordable marketing plans for the organisations.
In May, as ABBA Voyage opened their doors, 2.8 Million Minds launched. We worked in collaboration with Chisenhale Gallery, Bernie Arts Centre and Madlove putting children and young people at the heart of the conversation. Three groups of young people worked together to design a manifesto about mental health and how culture can support them – and presented it to a full audience in a chamber at the Houses of Parliament. Just last week, this important work was highly commended in the Creative Health and Wellbeing Alliance Awards in the Collective Power Awards section.
In June the Mayor announced the expansion of the Creative Enterprise Zones with an investment of £800,000 to support thousands of jobs and create affordable studio space across the capital. Hammersmith & Fulham and Ealing also became the Mayor’s latest Creative Enterprise Zones, joining Croydon, Haringey, Hounslow, Lambeth, Lewisham, Hackney and Tower Hamlets, and Waltham Forest. All the zones received a share of £800,000 which will help support 5,000 young Londoners to enter the creative sector and create more than 25,000 sqm of new, permanent, affordable workspace for the sector by 2025.
Debbie Weekes-Bernard, Deputy Mayor for Communities unveiled the final installation of LDN WMN at West Hampstead Primary school. Celebrating Doctor Beryl Gilroy, the first black headteacher in Camden and created by artist Fipsi Seilern. We’ve just launched a short video of the day. LDNWMN is a series of free artworks across London, mainly produced by women and non-binary artists.
In July the Mayor officially opened Talent House. Bringing together UD Music and East London Dance under one roof. A pioneering music and dance hub for the young people of East London.
Part of London Borough of Culture, Liberty Festival at The Albany showcased 70 D/deaf and disabled artists’ work. Also in the borough, 20,000 people descended on Mountsfield Park for the return of the iconic People’s Day.
The 10th anniversary of the London Olympic and Paralympic games was marked in style with the Great Get Together (a family festival at the park) and a summer season of art led by our East Bank partners. East Bank is a new cultural quarter supported by the Mayor, creating opportunities for the local community and everyone who visits, lives and works in east London. Our partners are BBC, Sadler’s Wells, UAL’s London College of Fashion, University College London and the V&A. It’s beginning to open, University College London welcomed their first students this year.
In its first phase of its Cultural Impact Award, Hammersmith & Fulham carved pathways for young people to make music, through over 120 music workshops for young people across the borough. This summer, The Big Gig at Westfield London showcased the work of 26 budding musicians.
The safety of women and girls around the clock remains a priority, the Mayor invested £108,000 earlier this year to boost his Women’s Night Safety Charter and the support available to signatories. In September, we passed the 1,000 mark in terms of venues and organisations that have signed up to the Charter, keeping London safe.
Antelope by Samson Kambalu was unveiled as the latest sculpture on the Fourth Plinth. Antelope is a restaging of a photograph from 1914 of Malawian Baptist Preacher and Pan-Africanist, John Chilembwe and European missionary, John Chorley. Chilembwe keeps his hat on in defiance of the colonial rule that forbade Africans from wearing hats before white people.
In October, the World Cities Culture Forum celebrated 10 years with the Helsinki Summit bringing together cultural leaders from over 40 global cities to share best practice in policymaking to address local and global challenges within the culture sector. The city of Helsinki provided a much-admired example of how they responded to the pandemic.  At a time when travel was severely restricted, Helsinki helped people experience culture at the hyper local level. Through the city’s Gift of Art project, the public could ‘gift’ an outdoor performance via a digital app to friends and family on their doorstep. At the summit the 2022 report was launched exploring how creativity drives recovery.
November saw the last events of London Unseen – a season of trails, tours and events about the many incredible histories of the city, told by communities, practitioners, artists and activists. Curated on behalf of the Mayor’s Commission for Diversity in the Public Realm. The season provided over 40 free public events. Telling many rich, exciting and moving histories: from the invisible tales of Indian seafarers in WWI, to Black History in Elephant & Castle, from LGBTQI+ stories in North London to legends of nature in the woodlands of Barham Park.
Our Culture and Community Spaces at Risk team hosted a Skills Forum at City Hall – a day of peer to peer learning for culture and community spaces across London. Topics included strategies for successfully engaging local authorities, navigating and utilizing the planning system, documenting the social value of work through film, exploring alternative business models and re-imagining governance for grassroots organisations.   

We hope that you have had the opportunity to enjoy some of the many incredible arts and culture events, venues and great people that London has to offer. It is so exciting to look at everything our Culture and Creative Industries and 24 Hour London teams have achieved this year and look forward to even more in 2023.

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ICE London 2023 to feature exhibitors from record 68 nations – IAG

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Industry trade show ICE London will feature exhibitors from a record 68 nations, topping the previous best of 65 set three years ago, according to organizer Clarion Gaming.
ICE London returns as a full-sized show for the first time since 2020 from 7 to 9 February, with the total 623 exhibitors representing everything from Argentina to Australia and Macau to Mexico.
“No other exhibition in the gaming space can come anywhere near the internationalism of ICE,” said Clarion Gaming Managing Director, Stuart Hunter.
“To have 68 nations represented by our community of exhibitors means that visitors are immediately part of what is a global experience with unique access to the smartest gaming innovators drawn from every corner of the world. There are very few exhibitions of scale in any industry sector which are able to compare with such international representation and legitimately lay claim to being a ‘global’ or a ‘world’ event.
“Once an event is recognized as being genuinely international, stakeholder groups including brands, regulators, trade associations, media groups and strategic industry-wide bodies focus their activities accordingly.
“Research that we’ve undertaken has shown that for many people ICE and iGB Affiliate London actually start on the Sunday preceding and finish on the following Saturday. In that week we estimate that over 100 gambling industry events will take place outside of the show hours providing a new and compelling perspective on why ICE and iGB Affiliate London are so influential and important to the world industry.”
IAG will have a team of four at ICE London next week. Visit us at Stand ND7-C.

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David Ford and Annie Dressner Live in London

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There’s something special about London on a Saturday night – there’s a certain buzz in the air as you head into the Capital city. For me that buzz was extra special, as I was going to see David Ford and Annie Dressner at The Lexington in Islington. I literally listened to their ’10 Days (Live)’ album for the first time a week ago, but since then it’s been on repeat and heading in I knew that the night was going to be special.
The Lexington is a great place for music, with a bar on the ground floor before heading up the winding stairs to the spacious venue itself. And as the crowd started coming in, the atmosphere in the room was growing by the minute.
Opening the night was Scottish singer songwriter Gary Stewart. He set the night off really well, with an engaging set that got the crowd onside from the start. He opened with his 2021 single ‘Hot To Trot‘ and you already knew the set was going to be a good one – a rousing folk song with great lyrical dexterity. The highlight of the set was ‘Frontlines’, a simply gorgeous song (check out a YouTube video of the song here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDCLwYwsesk). Gary ended with a fine cover of Paul Simon’s ‘Song for the Asking’.
It was time for a quick visit to the bar before settling down for the main event. 
The duo appeared on the stage to great applause, David in an orange shirt and Annie in a sparkling black dress. They opened with ‘Easy Falling’, the first song that I’ve ever heard of theirs, and a song that convinced me I needed to listen to the rest of the album. This slow and moving number is a touching love song and shows off the brilliant harmonies of David and Annie – there’s something special about the English (David) and US accents (Annie) mingling in the way that they do. 
Throughout the set, there were so many highlights. ‘Something I’ll Have to Learn‘ is a song with an almost timeless feel that feels like a conversation in song, Annie’s original ‘Strangers Who Knew Each Other’s Names‘ was simply brilliant and ‘Some Folks Are Lucky I Guess‘ is a song with a great sentiment. ‘Can’t Help What I Want‘ (below) is a great example of those brilliant harmonies that the two share.

‘Trash‘, a cover of the Suede hit, was a particular highlight – a song that was a nice surprise on the live album. As they break into ‘Oh maybe, maybe it’s the clothes you wear‘ it almost feels like this was a song that Suede wrote for David and Annie, their version is that good. Outstanding.
The set had a second cover, a song that Annie introduced as ‘an American classic‘. This classic was ‘Ain’t No Pleasing You‘ from Chas and Dave, a song that typified the cockney sound of London back in the 1980’s. I love the way they re-worked it and there was something special about the way Annie sings the word ‘Darling’ in her US twang that just resonated and put a smile on my face.
There were great moments of humour throughout the night, the chat between the two great. At one point mid-song, Annie passed her guitar to David, exclaiming ‘I knew there were chords in this song, I just didn’t know which ones‘ which had the crowd laughing.
The best of the night was saved till last. ‘Warning Sign’ had quickly become my favourite song from the pair and hearing it live in person lived up to all expectations. There’s such a beauty in live music, and hearing songs like this with other people in a venue can really bring a song home – and almost even change your own personal relationship with a song.
The final song of the night (there was no encore as David explained that they literally had no more songs!) was ‘Put Me In A Corner’. Annie’s vocals take the lead in this track and it was just magical, the emotion of the song emanating from the stage and filling the room. You can listen and see for yourself below.

You never know what to expect when you see an artist or artists perform for the first time. Some exceed expectations and some just don’t hit the heights you expect. In David Ford and Annie Dressner, it was definitely the former. The gig was stripped back – just two people on a stage creating a moment. And what a moment it was.
Annie and David and reviewer Nick Cantwell
Check out their websites and hit and follow the social links!
http://www.dressnerford.com/

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http://anniedressner.com/
***Note – I need to say a word about the audience for the gig. The audience was impeccable, with barely any talking at all at any point (apart from whispered orders at the bar). Credit goes to Gary, Annie and David, who managed to grab the audience from the start, but also to everyone there. If you were there yourself, give yourself a high five!***
Review written by Nick Cantwell (instagram.com/nickcantwellmanagement)
 
 
 


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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

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Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

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