Connect with us

Uncategorized

Yinka Ilori shop opens in Shoreditch, London

Published

on



Two years since launching the Yinka Ilori Homeware brand, the designer opens his first pop-up store in Shoreditch, east London. Featuring Yinka Ilori’s signature colourful motifs, the space is inspired by West African architecture and features his homeware products as well as limited-edition pieces and a new collection created to coincide with the launch. (Image credit: Ed Reeve)With his first retail space, Ilori aims to explore how stores can help customers ‘connect, experience and discover’, at a time when the retail sector faces creative and practical challenges. Inspired by his heritage, the designer created colourful display furniture whose forms nod to the architecture of houses and mosques in Burkina Faso, rendered in a bright palette of blue, green, pink and red to instil a sense of joy and optimism in his visitors.(Image credit: Ed Reeve)Ilori’s new collection is also aimed at fostering joy and togetherness, with stationery, games and homeware that focus on ‘memory-making and play’. These include the ‘Ayo Game’, a strategy game popular among the Yoruba people, which Ilori redesigned as a collectible object, as well as notebooks and umbrellas.‘The high street plays such an important role in our communities but in recent years we have experienced a steep decline, with many independent businesses struggling,’ says Ilori, who in 2021 took over a nearby space to create a play area inspired by a traditional London launderette in collaboration with Lego.(Image credit: Ed Reeve)Community is central to the designer’s work. Drawing from his childhood growing up on a north-west London council estate, and with the current struggles of families everywhere in mind, Ilori will donate 5 per cent of profits from the shop to Shelter, a charity dedicated to supporting those who struggle with housing or homelessness.‘With this pop-up, I wanted to bring retail back and design a fun, engaging space that tells a story. I want to start a conversation about the future of our stores, how we curate these spaces and what experiences we can create to forge deeper, more meaningful connections.’Yinka Ilori Shop, until 3 January 20239 Club RowLondon E1 6JXyinkailori.com (opens in new tab)(Image credit: Ed Reeve)(Image credit: Ed Reeve)

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

E-posta hesabınız yayımlanmayacak. Gerekli alanlar * ile işaretlenmişlerdir

Uncategorized

Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

Published

on

By



Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

The dwindling case for living in London

Published

on

By


The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

Most popular

Steerpike

Is Prince Harry holding Meghan back?

London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

January sale: save over 60%

Get a whole year’s worth of The Spectator from just £49

CLAIM

By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Gentrification is not a sin

Published

on

By


Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

Continue Reading

Trending

101thingsbeforeyoudie All Rights Reserved. - © 2022