Connect with us

Uncategorized

The Battle of Cable Street

Published

on



Love This? Save and Share!The Battle of Cable Street is a vital part of London history. Read on to discover more about the fight to keep the East End free of fascists, and the legacy that still stands today. Fascist and antifascist clashes aren’t just the hallmark of contemporary American politics. They’ve happened right here on London’s streets. Though, when they happened here it wasn’t in protest to an orange-faced real estate agent’s white house philandering, but the very real threat of Adolf Hitler. The events that unfolded at the Battle of Cable Street would shape the way the UK handled fascism and set the groundwork for people across Europe trying to resist it.The legacy rings as true today as it did then, and a walk down Cable Street to check out the mural in the battle’s memory is a perfect chance to explore it. Why Visit Cable Street?To see a mural of an important event in Britain’s antifascist history, and to walk in the footsteps of its heroes. The Battle of Cable Street is remembered as the moment Britain stood up against fascism in its borders. The events of October 4th 1936 directly led to the passing of the Public Order Act which banned the wearing of political uniforms in public. Go and check out a slice of history.The History of The Battle of Cable StreetThe Battle of Cable Street is the upshot of two major themes of the era, the rise of fascism, and antisemitism, set to the grim beat of a global economy struggling from the Great Depression, of Hitler’s growing military strength and the clip of fascist military boots in Spain. Fascism was gaining power in England too. At its helm, a man named Oswald Mosley, leader of the BUF or British Union of Fascists. By 1936 their membership numbered over 40,000. With their growing voice, and voices in Europe, antisemitism was rife. Jews were blamed for the great depression, and at once painted as greedy capitalists and devious communists. It would not have been uncommon to hear elected officials say the kind of things that have caused every sponsor to drop and run for cover from Kanye West.  The Battle Oswald Mosely, backed by Benito Mussolini in Italy and elements of the British political establishment, decided to launch a fascist march through the streets of London. The march planned to cut through the East End, a part of London with a strong Jewish community. This was no mistake. The march was intended as an out and out display of the antisemetic politics that underpins fascist ideology. Hundreds of thousands of Londoners petitioned government not to let the march happen, but blocking it was deemed antidemocratic and so it got the go ahead. On October 4th 1936, Moseley and 2,000 fascists gathered to take to the streets, but what they found as they set off for the East End was a unified mob of locals who had banded together to block their route. The group was 100,000 strong, made of locals, Jewish people, communists, and trade unions. They’d blocked the streets using overturned trucks and debris. Sympathetic tram drivers had even left their vehicles in the middle of the roads as obstacles. Mosley’s marchers set off with 6,000 policemen as an escort and when they reached the barriers things turned ugly. Fights broke out in several areas but most severely along Cable street where mounted police attacked the antifascists with truncheons. The police were pelted with rotten fruit, bricks and bottles by the East Enders. Local cafes were turned into aid stations to treat injured defenders. Even children mucked in, rolling marbles under the hoofs of horses.  Luckily no one was killed. The fascist were put off though and, after much entreatment from the police, were forced to redirect the march to Hyde Park instead, to avoid further conflict. By the end of the day 79 antifascists had been taken into custody, many of whom had been beaten by police. Only six fascists were arrested. Legacy Just two days after the Battle of Cable Street Mosley was in Germany getting married. And yes, Hitler was at his wedding. Things didn’t look up for the BUF for much longer after that. Disappointed with the results of their march, Musolini withdrew his support from the BUF. By 1940 the group had been disbanded by law for treason, its members rounded up and, Mosley included, sent to prison. The slogan of the day: “they shall not pass” lived on to be the antifascist mantra of the Spanish civil war, and perhaps to inspire the immortal words of Gandalf. The Mural Today Cable Street has a very visual reminder of the events of the day. It comes in the form of a mural painted on the side of a building near where the battle took place. The work for the mural began in 1976 when artist Dave Binnington was given Arts Council funding for the project. He began by interviewing local residents to get details about the day from people who were there. Binnington began painting in 1979 but the project was more complicated than he imagined and stalled several times, eventually Binnington abandoned the mural after it was vandalised with fascist slogans, causing him to lose hope. Work was picked up 1982 by Paul Butler, Ray Walker and Desmond Rochfort who had worked with Binnignton before. They finished his design and removed the defaced sections, eventually painting over them entirely. Today the battle of Cable Street Mural stands in all its fisheyed glory, a coat of special varnish on it to protect it from further damage. You can visit it at the address below. Cable Street Mural: Practical InformationAddress: 236 Cable Street E1 0BLYou can see the Cable Street Mural for free anytime of the day. Shadwell is the nearest DLR station.Cable Street: Map Cable Street Mural: Read Next

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

E-posta hesabınız yayımlanmayacak. Gerekli alanlar * ile işaretlenmişlerdir

Uncategorized

Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties – Church Times

Published

on

By



Graduate Organist vacancy in London and Home Counties  Church Times

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

The dwindling case for living in London

Published

on

By


The recent debate around ‘levelling up’ may be missing something. I would argue that there is another way to consider geographical inequality – and, by this alternative measure, a levelling has been under way for more than 20 years.

I’ve spent three decades working in advertising, so it’s unsurprising that I tend to view economic life through the lens of consumption. By contrast, mainstream economists tend to view disparities through the medium of earnings or wealth. To me, measures of wealth should include not only the quantity of money you have but the breadth of worthwhile options available in choosing how to spend it.

Let’s put it another way. If you live in a boring village, and suddenly a great pub or café opens on the high street, then by my measure you have become richer; by the economist’s measure you have not.

Things that would once have been available in London decades before the provinces now appear everywhereat once 

There was undoubtedly a time when you were richer in London in two ways. You had more money, but you also had a far more exciting range of ways to spend it. Now not so much.

Most popular

Steerpike

Is Prince Harry holding Meghan back?

London is a great city but, in terms of consumption quality, it has not improved markedly in the past 20 years. Over the same period, many smaller cities and even towns have advanced rapidly, significantly narrowing the gap. The kind of things that would once have been available in the capital decades before making it to the provinces – like sushi – now appear everywhere at once. Consider Turkish barbers, who seem to have taken over the country in only five years. (I can remember a time when it was enough just to get a haircut without having burning methylated spirits flicked in my ears. Back then I just didn’t know any better.)

This levelling is especially true of anything in the digital world: Amazon gadgets, Netflix films, Asos fashions and PlayStation games hit Aberystwyth the same day they hit Islington. But it also applies to the physical environment, as anyone over 50 can attest. I went to Manchester and Sheffield for the first time in 1989. Compared with London, they were then, let’s be honest, utterly rubbish. Now, when I visit those same cities, I experience mild ‘northern envy’. There are interesting places open everywhere. Northerners have better cars, because they have more money left over after paying for housing. And they are much better-looking, because they can nip home to get changed before going out.

Relatively speaking, London has improved far less dramatically than these provincial cities have. (New York, many aficionados argue, has got worse.) OK, the Tube is better than it used to be. Uber is a handy addition. But some things are awful – the last pleasure of driving in London ended when they put speed cameras on the Westway. Accommodation costs for the young wipe out any salary gains.

January sale: save over 60%

Get a whole year’s worth of The Spectator from just £49

CLAIM

By my measure, high property prices won’t just hit Londoners once – they’ll hit them twice. Not only do high rents wipe out what you earn, they also put at risk London’s once unassailable advantage as a great place to spend what money you have left. Creative businesses of any kind require space at a price which allows them to take risks. For a time, London found this space by moving its heartland from west to east. But suppose the people supporting what Douglas McWilliams calls ‘the flat white economy’ flee altogether? In my own experience, Kent suddenly seems weirdly full of fascinating restaurants founded by London exiles. If more of these people leave, the case for staying weakens further.

Londoners always say things like ‘Yes but there’s the theatre’. Let’s face it though – even Shakespeare left London for Stratford in his mid-forties. As he no doubt found, the theatre is all very well, but it’s nothing like being able to park outside your house.

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Gentrification is not a sin

Published

on

By


Gentrification is not a sin – UnHerd

Continue Reading

Trending

101thingsbeforeyoudie All Rights Reserved. - © 2022